Man Struggles For 18 Months Believing He's Literally A Zombie

Warren McKinlay from Essex, England, probably seemed like a happy, healthy guy to everyone he knew.

But after the 35-year-old was involved in a motorcycle accident that nearly claimed his life in 2005, his family noticed that something just wasn't right with him. It turns out that inside, he was struggling with the unimaginable belief that he wasn't among the living. He was convinced for 18 months that he was a zombie.

Though he survived the crash, McKinlay walked away with a brain injury that made him think he had actually died. Before all of this, he had served seven years in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, a branch of the British Army.

“I was treated at a time when many soldiers were coming back from Afghanistan with no legs and no arms," he told Mirror Online.

"I was surrounded by stories of death – it was like I was in a living nightmare. I refused to eat as I thought there was no point as I’d already died. It was like I was living in an alternate reality."

He became increasingly distant with his family and didn't care about anything anymore. Things started to look hopeless until he finally admitted to his therapist that he thought he was dead.

He became increasingly distant with his family and didn't care about anything anymore.   Things started to look hopeless until he finally admitted to his therapist that he thought he was dead.
Facebook / Warren McKinlay

Soon after, he was diagnosed with Cotard's Syndrome, or "walking corpse syndrome." It is a rare mental illness that causes people to believe they are dead, they don't exist, or that they have lost their blood and internal organs.

First identified in 1880 by neurologist Jules Cotard, the disorder is believed to be caused by the fusiform gyrus and the amygdalae not functioning correctly. These parts of the brain recognize faces and assign emotions to them.

This causes people with Cotard's syndrome to become unfamiliar with the faces they are looking at, including their own. They can lose their sense of self as a result and become disconnected from reality.

Fortunately, McKinlay was sent to the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre Headley Court in Surrey, where he received treatment and even became friends with a person who was also suffering from the syndrome.

While he still struggles knowing that he has a brain injury, he's no longer under the impression that he is a walking corpse.

I can't even imagine how strange and horrifying it would feel to think that you're a literal zombie. It's a really good thing that he got the help he desperately needed.

Man Struggles For 18 Months Believing He's Literally A Zombie Man Struggles For 18 Months Believing He's Literally A Zombie Reviewed by ricardo on 5:37 a. m. Rating: 5

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